MELODIYA 10" LP 17627-28: KHRENNIKOV - Symphony No. 2 - 1960s NM
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Background on this item -
Tikhon Nikolayevich Khrennikov [O.S. May 28] 1913 – 14 August 2007) was a Russian and Soviet composer, pianist, leader of the Union of Soviet Composers, who was also known for his political activities. He wrote three symphonies, four piano concertos, two violin concertos, two cello concertos, operas, operettas, ballets, chamber music, incidental music and film music.

Tikhon Khrennikov was the youngest of ten children, born into a family of horse traders in the town of Yelets, Oryol Governorate, Russian Empire (now in Lipetsk Oblast in central Russia).
He learned guitar and mandolin from members of his family and sang in a local choir in Yelets. There he also played in a local orchestra and learned the piano. As a teenager he moved to Moscow. From 1929 to 1932, he studied composition at the Gnessin State Musical College under Mikhail Gnessin and Yefraim Gelman. From 1932 to 1936, he attended the Moscow Conservatory. There he studied composition under Vissarion Shebalin and piano under Heinrich Neuhaus. As a student, he wrote and played his Piano Concerto No. 1, and his graduation piece was the Symphony No. 1. His first symphony was conducted by Leopold Stokowski. He became popular with the series of songs and serenades that he composed for the 1936 production of Much Ado About Nothing at the Vakhtangov Theatre in Moscow.

By the 1930s, Khrennikov was already treated as a leading official Soviet composer. Typical was his speech during a discussion in February 1936 concerning Pravda articles "Chaos instead of music" and "Ballet falseness":

The resolution on 23rd April 1932 appealed to the consciousness of the Soviet artist. Soviet artists had not withstood scrutiny. After 23rd April, youth was inspired to study. The problem was, we had to master the skills and techniques of composition. We developed an enthusiasm for modern western composers. The names of Hindemith and Krenek came to be symbols of advanced modern artists. […] After the enthusiasm for western tendencies came an attraction to simplicity, influenced by composing for the theatre, where simple, expressive music was required. We grew, our consciousness also grew, as well as the aspiration to be genuine Soviet composers, representatives of our epoch. Compositions by Hindemith satisfied us no more. Soon after that Prokofiev arrived, declaring Soviet music to be provincial and naming Shostakovich as the most up-to-date composer. Young composers were confused: on the one hand, they wanted to create simpler music that would be easier for the masses to understand; on the other hand, they were confronted with the statements of such musical authorities as Prokofiev. Critics wrote  laudatory odes to Shostakovich. […] How did young composers react to Lady Macbeth [of Mtensk]? This opera contains several large melodic fragments which opened some creative perspectives to us. But the entre‘actes and other things aroused complete hostility.

Together with other official representatives of Soviet culture (N.Chelyapov, N. Myaskovsky, N. Chemberdzhi, S. Vasilenko, V. Bely, A. Veprik, A. Khachaturian, B. Shekhter, M.Starodokamsky, G. Khubov, V. Muradeli, V. Yurovsky and L. Kulakovsky), Khrennikov signed the statement welcoming "a sentence of the Supreme Court of the Soviet Union, passed on traitors against the motherland, fascist hirelings, such as Tukhachevsky, Yakir and others".

Having "adopted the optimistic, dramatic and unabashedly lyrical style favored by Soviet leaders", Khrennikov shot to fame in 1941, with the "Song of Moscow" ("Свинарка и пастух", meaning  "Swineherd and Shepherd") from his music score for the popular Soviet film They Met in Moscow, for which he was awarded the Stalin Prize. In 1941, Khrennikov was appointed Music Director of the Central Theatre of the Red Army, a position he would keep for 25 years.

In February 1945 Khrennikov was officially posted by the Political Authority (Politupravlenie) of the Red Army from Sverdlovsk, where he and his family had been evacuated, to the First Belorussian Front, and the Army commanded by General (later Marshal) Chuikov.

In 1947 he joined the Communist party and became a deputy of the Supreme Soviet.

In 1948, Andrei Zhdanov appointed Khrennikov Secretary of the Union of Soviet Composers, a job he would keep until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and for which he is most remembered.

For a long time it was held that, thanks to Khrennikov's efforts, no Soviet composers were arrested or prosecuted.

MELODIYA Records 10” LP item - BLUE record labels with SILVER lettering - see pictures with this listing for more detail
Record Made in the USSR (Russia)
Pressing is in MONO
Record Speed: 33 rpm
Record issued in the 1960’s - we don't know for sure as there is nothing on the LP or jacket to indicate a date of manufature
Record Catalog Number: 33** 17627-28

This listing is for a very rare, out of print 10” LP featuring the music of -

Tikhon KHRENNIKOV

10" LP Title -
KHRENNIKOV / Symphony  No. 2

Performers on this title include -
G. Rozhdestvensky, conductor
Moscow Radio Large Symphony Orchestra

Track listings -
1. Symphony No. 2 in C Minor, Op. 9

CONDITION Details:
The JACKET:
The LP jacket is in Near MINT minus condition.
The jacket has NO seam splits - it is completely intact, and shows only some shelf wear, primarily at the seams and corners. 
It has NO drill holes or saw marks of any kind on the jacket. 
There is NO hand writing on any part of the jacket, front or back (see picture for more detail).
The cover has clean and sharp colors, just gorgeous - see picture with this listing for more detail.

The LP (vinyl) itself:
The LP is in near MINT minus condition! - like NEW!!
The LP retains much of the original gloss and sheen!
The record has no serious marks, obviously well taken care of.
There are NO spindle marks on the record labels.
This is the near mint copy you have always wanted in your collection - any super picky audiophile would be happy with this one! A better copy would be very difficult to locate!
This LP may have a slight mark or two (spider marks) which are caused by sliding the LP in and out of the inner sleeve and are usually not audible on most audio systems.

Please understand that this is a vintage LP record - as such, one cannot expect the vinyl to sound like a brand new, audiophile pressing! Some noise is inevitable - for best results, always properly clean your LPs before playing them.

The LP is an audiophile quality pressing (any collector of fine MFSL, half speeds, direct to discs, Japanese/UK pressings etc., can attest to the difference a quality pressing can make to an audio system).

A Short Note About LP GRADING -
Mint {M} = Only used for sealed items.
Near Mint {NM} = Virtually flawless in every way.
Near Mint Minus {NM-} = Item has some minor imperfections, some audible.
Excellent {EXC} = Item obviously played and enjoyed with some noise.
Very Good Plus {VG+} = Many more imperfections which are noticeable and obtrusive.

Don't let this rarity slip by!!!

  • Item #: Melodiya 10" LP 17627-28 NM
  • Manufacturer: Melodiya Records
  • Condition: Used

MELODIYA 10" LP 17627-28: KHRENNIKOV - Symphony No. 2 - 1960s NM

Price: $24.99
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