DCC GOLD CD GZS 1087: SONNY ROLLINS - Tenor Madness 1995 JPN SS
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Theodore Walter "Sonny" Rollins (born September 7, 1930 in New York City) is an American jazz tenor saxophonist. Rollins is widely recognized as one of the most important and influential jazz musicians. A number of his compositions, including "St. Thomas", "Oleo", "Doxy", and "Airegin", have become jazz standards.

Although Rollins was born in New York City, his parents were born in the United States Virgin Islands. Rollins received his first saxophone at age 13. He attended Benjamin Franklin High School in East Harlem. He said that a concert by Frank Sinatra there, accompanied by a plea for racial harmony, changed his life.

Rollins started as a pianist, changed to alto saxophone, and finally switched to tenor in 1946. During his high-school years, he played in a band with other future jazz legends Jackie McLean, Kenny Drew and Art Taylor. He was first recorded in 1949 with Babs Gonzales (J.J. Johnson was the arranger of the group). In his recordings through 1954, he played with performers such as Miles Davis, Charlie Parker and Thelonious Monk.

In 1950, Rollins was arrested for armed robbery and given a sentence of three years. He spent 10 months in Rikers Island jail before he was released on parole. In 1952 he was arrested for violating the terms of his parole by using heroin. Rollins was assigned to the Federal Medical Center, Lexington, at the time the only assistance in the U.S. for drug addicts. While there he was a volunteer for then-experimental methadone therapy and was able to break his heroin habit. Rollins himself initially feared sobriety would impair his musicianship, but then went on to greater success. As a saxophonist he had initially been attracted to the jump and R&B sounds of performers like Louis Jordan, but soon became drawn into the mainstream tenor saxophone tradition. Joachim Berendt has described this tradition as sitting between the two poles of the strong sonority of Coleman Hawkins and the light flexible phrasing of Lester Young, which did so much to inspire the fleet improvisation of be-bop in the 1950s.

Rollins began to make a name for himself in 1949 as he recorded with J.J. Johnson and Bud Powell what would later be called "Hard Bop", with Miles Davis in 1951, with the Modern Jazz Quartet and with Thelonious Monk in 1953, but the breakthrough arrived in 1954 when he recorded his famous compositions "Oleo" "Airegin" and "Doxy" with a quintet led by Davis. Rollins then joined the Miles Davis Quintet in the summer of 1955, but left after a short stay to deal with his drug problems. Rollins was invited later in 1955 to join the Clifford Brown–Max Roach quintet; studio recordings documenting his time in the band are the albums Clifford Brown and Max Roach at Basin Street and Sonny Rollins Plus 4. After Brown's death in 1956 Rollins began his subsequent career as a leader, his first long-playing albums released on Prestige Records. He also recorded during the 1950s for Blue Note, Riverside, and the Los Angeles label Contemporary.

Tenor Madness is a jazz album by Sonny Rollins. It is most notable for its title track, the only known recording featuring both Rollins and John Coltrane.

Rollins and Coltrane had both been members of groups with Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk in the past. Rollins had had some recent success, and both were emerging as prominent solo tenor saxophone players. Coltrane, Red Garland, Paul Chambers, and Philly Joe Jones, had been recording with Davis at Rudy Van Gelder's studio in New Jersey (sessions that would later go on to provide material for the albums Workin' with the Miles Davis Quintet, Relaxin' with the Miles Davis Quintet, and Steamin' with the Miles Davis Quintet). At the same time, and at the same studio, Rollins was working on the albums Sonny Rollins Plus 4 and Three Giants. As it was common at the time for jazz musicians recording in the same studio to record some sessions together, Rollins and Davis' group recorded together, though without Davis, material which later went on to be Tenor Madness.

The title track is a twelve-minute duet between Rollins and Coltrane, and the B-flat blues melody has become very well known for Rollins. It is easy to distinguish between the two saxophonists, as Coltrane has a much brighter and boisterous sound as compared to Rollins' smoother, "wet-reed" tone. However, as jazz critic Dan Krow said, the two complement each other, and the track does not sound like a competition between the two rising saxophonists.

"Paul's Pal", a jumpy swing track, is a Rollins composition, named for Miles Davis Quintet bassist (and bassist on this album) Paul Chambers. "When Your Lover Has Gone" is a 1931 composition by Einar Aaron Swan, re-interpreted here as a drum-driven blues track. The Clinton & Debussy ballad "My Reverie" is one of Rollins' most prominent examples of his lyrical skills from his 1950s' recordings. "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World", a tune from the 1935 musical Jumbo, is a Rodgers & Hart composition which goes here from a jazz waltz to a fast-paced 4/4 tune.

The Allmusic review by Michael G. Nastos calls the album "A recording that should stand proudly alongside Saxophone Colossus as some of the best work of Sonny Rollins in his early years, it's also a testament to the validity, vibrancy, and depth of modern jazz in the post-World War era. It belongs on everybody's shelf". Author and musician Peter Niklas Wilson called it "one of the most famous combo recordings of the 1950s”.

Recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey on May 24, 1956. Includes liner notes by Ira Gitler and Mark Gardner. Digitally remastered using 20-bit K2 Super Coding System technology. It's interesting to contrast Sonny Rollins' playing here, backed by the 1956 Miles Davis rhythm section, and his work with Ray Brown/Max Roach Incorporated. Certainly if Clifford Brown hadn't died that summer in an auto wreck, Rollins and his PLUS FOUR teammates would have continued to rival the creative output  of the heralded Davis Quintet. Here, Rollins and special guest John  Coltrane get right down to it on the classic riff "Tenor Madness." Coltrane is still zeroing in on his sound, while Sonny has found his  (for now). Coltrane chases the blue trains, the snakes and the wind on a fulminating solo, ending with a hint of "Stranger In Paradise." Rollins replies coyly--his sense of space and phrasing more akin to  Miles--painting with clouds, patiently elongating his line out of dozens of little melodic motifs, teasing Philly Joe until he busts, finishing with a counterpunching flurry of his own. As Coltrane and Rollins trade riffs and choruses, you can hear them commenting favorably on each others' inventions until they're practically one voice. For the remainder of TENOR MADNESS, Rollins contents himself to nurse the most possible melody and swing out of a few smokey orbs of sound, in the manner of mid '50s Lester Young. With "When Your Lover Has Gone" Sonny sets a relaxed groove atop Garland's magic chordal carpet, letting the action come to him, before giving way to a brilliant Chambers aria and a masterful Philly Joe solo. "Paul's Pal" and "My Reverie" are also given slow soulful treatments, while "The Most Beautiful Girl" concludes things at a brighter tempo, as Rollins toys with his beat like a cat with a mouse, before pouncing on it with Parker-ish rhythmic drive.

GOLD CD - DCC RECORDINGS // PRESTIGE series CD item - this item is FACTORY SEALED and in MINT condition
GOLD CD was made in Japan or the USA (can’t tell for certain until the Gold CD has been opened and physically checked)
GOLD CD pressing is in MONO
GOLD CD pressed and Issued by DCC RECORDINGS under license from PRESTIGE
GOLD CD issued in: 1995
GOLD CD Record Catalog Number: GZS 1087

Featured on this GOLD CD -

SONNY ROLLINS

Performers on this disc include -
Sonny Rollins - Tenor Saxophone
John Coltrane - Tenor Saxophone (#1 only)
Philly Joe Jones - Drums
Red Garland - Piano
Paul Chambers - Bass

GOLD CD Title -
TENOR MADNESS

Track Listings -
1. Tenor Madness
2. When Your Lover Has Gone
3. Paul's Pal
4. My Reverie
5. Most Beautiful Girl in the World, The

CONDITION Details:
The GOLD CD is from the very rare DCC Recordings series of audiophile CD titles.

GOLD CD re-mastered by Steve Hoffman
Pictures with this listing are of the actual item
Jewel Case IS the original flip up type
This item DOES come with the paper outer slip cover - it is complete and near perfect.
The original LP was issued on the PRESTIGE record label, in 1956

The GOLD CD, Jewel Case and INSERTS are all in MINT condition. The CD is actually FACTORY SEALED!!

The GOLD CD is an audiophile quality pressing (any collector of fine MFSL, half speeds, direct to discs, Japanese/UK pressings etc., can attest to the difference a quality pressing can make to an audio system).

Don't let this rarity slip by!!!

  • Item #: DCC GOLD CD GZS 1087 SS
  • Manufacturer: DCC - Digital Compact Classics Recordings
  • Condition: New

DCC GOLD CD GZS 1087: SONNY ROLLINS - Tenor Madness 1995 JPN SS

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