COLOSSEUM LP CRLP-101: D. OISTRAKH, Tchaikovsky Violin Conc 1953
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Background on this item -
All collectors of rare classical LPs, especially on the early USA made labels from the 1950's realize and understand, that the vinyl used during this period wasn't the type of vinyl formula found and appreciated by audiophiles today. Many of these titles suffered from  pressing defects - bubbles, distortion, noisy, etc. But these companies did have the distinction of recording and releasing some of the greatest performances and performers of the time - like this record featuring the esteemed Soviet violinist, David Oistrakh!

David Fyodorovich Oistrakh (or Oistrach), born September 30 [O.S. September 17] 1908 – October 24, 1974, was a Soviet violinist.

Oistrakh collaborated with major orchestras and musicians from many parts of the world, including the Soviet Union, Europe, and the United States, and was the dedicatee of numerous violin works, including both of Dmitri Shostakovich's violin concerti, and the violin concerto by Aram Khachaturian. He is considered one of the preeminent violinists of the 20th century.

He was born in the cosmopolitan city of Odessa in the Russian Empire (now Ukraine) into a Jewish family of merchants of the second guild. His father was David Kolker and his mother was Isabella Beyle (née Stepanovsky), who later on married Fishl Oistrakh. At the age of five, young Oistrakh began his studies of violin and viola as a pupil of Pyotr Stolyarsky. He would eventually come to predominantly perform on violin.

In 1914, at the age of six, Oistrakh performed his debut concert. He entered the Odessa Conservatory in 1923, where he studied until his graduation in 1926. In the Conservatory he also studied harmony with composer Mykola Vilinsky. His 1926 graduation concert consisted of Bach's Chaconne, Tartini's Devil's Trill Sonata, Rubinstein's Viola Sonata, and Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No. 1 in D major. In 1927, Oistrakh appeared as soloist playing the Glazunov Violin Concerto under the composer's own baton in Kiev, Ukraine—a concert which earned him an invitation to play the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto in Leningrad with the Philharmonic Orchestra under Nikolai Malko the following year.

In 1927, Oistrakh relocated to Moscow, where he gave his first recital and met his future wife: pianist Tamara Rotareva. They were married a year later, and had one child, Igor Oistrakh, who was born in 1931. Igor Oistrakh would follow his father's path as a violinist, and eventually performed and recorded side-by-side with his father, including Bach Double Concerto, which they first recorded in 1951, and Mozart's Sinfonia Concertante. In at least one of the recordings of Mozart's Sinfonia Concertante, Igor Oistrakh played violin, while David Oistrakh played viola.

From 1934 onwards, David Oistrakh held a position teaching at the Moscow Conservatory, and was later made professor in 1939. Some of his colleagues while teaching at the Moscow Conservatory included Yuri Yankelevich and Boris Goldstein. Oistrakh taught Oleg Kagan, Gidon Kremer, Victor Danchenko, Cyrus Forough, and his son, Igor Oistrakh.

From 1940 to 1963, Oistrakh performed extensively in a trio consisting of himself, cellist Sviatoslav Knushevitsky and pianist Lev Oborin. It was sometimes called the 'Oistrakh Trio.' Oistrakh collaborated extensively with Oborin, as well as Jacques Thibaud, a French violinist.Oistrakh received many awards and distinctions. Within the Soviet Union, David Oistrakh was awarded the Stalin Prize in 1943, the title of People's Artist of the USSR in 1953, and the Lenin Prize in 1960. He also won the 1935 Soviet Union Competition. Several reputable works from the standard violin repertoire are dedicated to Oistrakh, including a concerto by Khachaturian, two concerti by Shostakovich, and several other pieces.

Oistrakh's fame and success were not only limited to the Soviet Union: he placed second at the Henryk Wieniawski Violin Competition in Warsaw during the same year, only being bested by 16-year-old prodigy Ginette Neveu, and further improved upon that by winning the grand prize in the Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels.

Additionally, the asteroid 42516 Oistrach is named in honor of him and his son, the violinist Igor Oistrakh.

COLOSSEUM Records LP item - RED & GOLD record labels with inverse GOLD & RED lettering - see pictures
Record Made in: USA
Pressing is in MONO
Record Speed: 33 1/3 rpm
Record Made in:  early 1953
Record Catalog Number: CRLP 101

This listing is for a very rare, out of print LP featuring -

DAVID OISTRAKH

LP Title -
OISTRAKH / TCHAIKOVSKY Violin Concerto

Performers on this disc include -
David Oistrakh, violin
A. V. Gauk, conductor
Philharmonic Orchestra

Track listings -
1. Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto in D, Opus 35

CONDITION Details:
LP JACKET:
The LP jacket is in near mint minus condition - superb given it's age!
The jacket is completely intact with NO seam splits. The  jacket shows some mild shelf wear, primarily at the corners and seams (very heavy cardboard stock used for this jacket).
The jacket has NO drill holes or saw marks of any kind.
There is NO hand writing on the front or back of the jacket - actually quite lovely with it's colors.
The cover has clean and sharp colors, just a tiny bit of fading/staining due to age - see pictures with this listing for more detail.

The LP (vinyl) itself:
The LP is in EXCELLENT plus condition. - A finer copy of this vintage LP would be very hard to find. Consider that we are talking about USA made vinyl here and that it was made in 1953 - given these factors, the LP is in absolutely remarkable condition. NOT perfect, as these records never are, but a fine, collectors grade LP nonetheless.
The LP retains much of the original gloss and sheen!
The record has NO serious marks on it, obviously well taken care of.
The record labels have NO significant spindle marks on them.
This is the superb copy you have always wanted in your collection - any super picky audiophile should be happy with this one!
This LP does have some light marks (spider marks mostly) which are caused by sliding the LP in and out of the inner sleeve and are usually not audible on most audio systems.

Please understand that this is a vintage LP record - as such, one cannot expect the vinyl to sound like a brand new, audiophile pressing! Some noise is inevitable - for best results, always properly clean your LPs before playing them (even brand new LPs).

The LP is an audiophile quality pressing (any collector of fine MFSL, half speeds, direct to discs, Japanese/UK pressings etc., can attest to the difference a quality pressing can make to an audio system).

A Short Note About LP GRADING -
Mint {M} = Only used for sealed items.
Near Mint {NM} = Virtually flawless in every way.
Near Mint Minus {NM-} = Item has some minor imperfections, some audible.
Excellent {EXC} = Item obviously played and enjoyed with some noise.
Very Good Plus {VG+} = Many more imperfections which are noticeable and obtrusive.

Don't let this rarity slip by!!!

  • Item #: Colosseum LP CRLP-101 NM
  • Manufacturer: Colosseum Records
  • Condition: Used

COLOSSEUM LP CRLP-101: D. OISTRAKH, Tchaikovsky Violin Conc 1953

Price: $59.99
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